The Ozark Folk Center is a State Park located just out side of Mountain View Arkansas. The park and surrounding community is focused on preserving the old "Folk" ways of the mountains. They do this through dance, art, crafts and music. Some good home cooking is an added bonus. Mmmm... catfish, blackberry pie, cobbler's made with every type of fruit imaginable. We were fortunate to be able to stay at the lodge right in the park meaning we could walk to the music center, craft market etc. The two main draws of the park were the music and crafts. The craft market was set in an old town setting from the 1800's where crafter's made their crafts onsite, musicians played, and story tellers told tales to an interested ear. In addtion there was a nightly music concert in the theatre. The music was varied including country, gospel, and blue grass. Instraments like the dulcimer and spoons added to the uniqueness.

Our room at the lodge.
Room at Ozark Folk Center lodge

Another angle of our room at the lodge.
Room at Ozark Folk Center lodge

The court house in Mountain View. The building is now used as a tourist information center.
Mountain View Court House

The Music Concert started with a good old fashioned Square Dance. Click the image for a small video clip.
square dance


A closer shot of the band. The old guy on the banjo is one of the founders of the Folk Center and still works on the board.
Ozark Folk Center concert

A family performs at the concert. Getting younger members involved is one of their keys to success in keeping the park going. Click the image for a small video clip.
Ozark Folk Center concert


Ahhhh... the common spoon. Click the image for a small video clip of what spoons are really meant for. Spoons performed by Mary Gillihan accompanied by her husband Robert on the Autoharp. These two were chosen to represent the State of Arkansas at The White House.
Ozark Folk Center concert


Another band performs at the concert. It's hard to see but the woman sitting is playing a Dulcimer which has such a melow sound. You just have to hear one in real life to appreciate it. Click the image for a small video clip.
Ozark Folk Center concert


The trail from our room at the lodge to the Crafter's Village.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

Can anyone explain to me how a tree can grow out of a rock?.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

A unique German violin on display at the Music shop in the Village.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

The Crafter's Village had a number of circa 1800 to 1900 buildings reconstructed on the site. The next three shots are of the one room school house.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village


Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village


Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

A country garden in the village.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

A well hidden root celler in the garden.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

I had never seen a Mulberry Bush before so I had to take a picture.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

One of the crafter's busy at work making dolls out of corn husks.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

Two samples of her work.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

Some of the other buildings.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

We meant to ask what this hut was called and who built it but got side tracked by many of the crafter's willing to share information on how they made their crafts. Still an interesting shelter.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

A "stick bug" not so common in Canada (I've never seen one). Click the image for a small video clip.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village


The bees in the area were abnormally black compared to what we're use to seeing.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

More of the buildings in the village.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

When I'm in a garden I have to take at least a few close up shots of flowers.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

Sweet Peas, one of Olwyn's favorites.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

Rosie, the engine behind the merry-go-round.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

What a sweet face.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

Cockscomb in full bloom. Olwyn was so impressed with this one outside the quilting shop that the shop keeper gathered a few seeds for her.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

The trail back to our room.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

In our travels we had seen many excellent photos being sold in the shops. The photographer was a man named McSpadden. The day we were leaving the Folk Center area we stopped at a Dulcimer shop to find out a bit more information on them. Besides being a shop that custom makes dulcimers this shop also sold not only the completed instrament but kits to build your own. The shop also had a good sampling local pottery and McSpadden's photography. When I took this picture the the fellow put down his tools and came out to talk to me about my camera. I gave him the full story of how and why I switched to a digital camera. I explained the differences between film and digital capabilities and why some day I may switch back because I knew so well how a film and my old camera would perform. I felt so stupid to find out that this was Mr. McSpadden. He was so patient with my long winded geared to the amature lecture. Anyway...This is Mr. McSpadden making McSpadden dulcimers.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

Three photos of the yard surround the dulcimer shop. I never thought to take a picture of the shop itself. I guess it's just reason to go back.
Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village


Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village


Ozark Folk Center Crafter's village

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